Digging Sticks

b. Noose stick. A noose stick is useful for strangling and controlling improperly snared animals that are still alive.

(1) Find a pole as long as you can effectively handle.

(2) Attach a noose of wire or stiff cord at the small end.

(3) To catch an animal, slip the noose over the neck and pull it tight.

NOOSE STICK

c. Sling shot. A Y-shaped stick can easily be made into a sling shot. A sling shot is an extremely effective and accurate weapon.

(1) Locate a hardwood, Y-shaped piece of stick.

(2) From your survival kit, attach the sling shot rubber and pouch.

IMPROVISED SLING SHOT

d. Throwing stick. One of the simplest weapons for survival is the throwing stick. As a tool, the throwing stick can be used to knock dead branches out of a tree that would normally be too high to reach. The dead branches can then be used as firewood.

(1) Find a stick straight as possible, 2.5-3 feet long, and 1.5-2 inches in diameter.

(2) Remove the bark from the stick.

(3) Taper each end of the stick.

(4) Fire harden the entire stick if using green wood.

(5) There are two methods of employing the throwing stick. When in forested area, the best method is to use an overhand throwing motion. In an open area, you can increase the killing radius by using a sidearm throwing motion.

4. Cordage. Before making cordage, there are a few simple tests that can be done to determine the material's suitability. First, pull on a length of the material to test for strength. Next, twist it between your fingers and roll the fibers together. If it withstands this handling and does not snap apart, tie an overhand knot with the fibers and gently tighten. if the knot does not break, the material is usable.

a. Suitable cordage can be made from Iris leaves, Yucca, or Stinging Nettle stalks.

5. EXPEDIENT PACKS. The horseshoe pack is simple to make, use, and relatively comfortable to carry over one shoulder.

HORSESHOE PACK

a. Lay available square-shaped material, such as a poncho or tarp flat on the ground.

b. Lay items on one edge of the material. Place those items frequently used (i.e., canteens) on the outside. Pad the hard items.

c. Roll the material (with the items) towards the opposite edge and tie both ends securely.

d. Tie extra lines along the length of the bundle.

e. Fold bundle in half and secure a long piece of rope to the apex of the fold.

f. Attach pack to your body.

6. UTENSILS. Utensils are used for cooking, eating, and storing food.

a. Bowl or Container. Bowls and containers can serve to carry and store food. They can be made from bone and wood. To make them out of wood:

(1) Locate or split a piece of wood.

(2) Coal burn to the desired depth.

COAL BURNED BOWLS

b. Spork. A spork is a useful tool to eat with. With a knife, carve a piece of wood into the desired shape.

SPORK

c. Tongs. Thongs aid to move hot items, such as coal embers. (1) Cut a piece of green sapling.

(2) Split the sapling in half and shave off the bark. Flatten both ends of each section.

(3) Fire harden each half.

THIS END WILL NATURALLY BOW OUTWARD

THIS END WILL NATURALLY BOW OUTWARD

SPLIT STICK LASH ENDS TOGETHER

IN HALF

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