Key Information

G Y R

TERRAIN: Is the terrain capable of producing an avalanche? -Slope angle (steep enough to slide? prime time?) -Slope aspect (leeward, shadowed, or extremely sunny?) -Slope configuration (anchoring? shape?)

Overall Terrain Rating:

TERRAIN: Is the terrain capable of producing an avalanche? -Slope angle (steep enough to slide? prime time?) -Slope aspect (leeward, shadowed, or extremely sunny?) -Slope configuration (anchoring? shape?)

Overall Terrain Rating:

SNOWPACK: Could the snow fail?

-Slab Configuration (slab? depth and distribution?) -Bonding Ability (weak layer? tender spots?) -Sensitivity (how much force to fail? shear tests? clues?)

Overall Snowpack Rating:

Weather: Is the weather contributing to instability?

-Precipitation (type, amount, intensity? added weight?) -Wind (snow transport? amount and rate of deposition?) -Temperature (storm trends? effects on snowpack?)

Overall Weather Rating:

Human: What are your alternatives and their possible consequences?

-Attitude (toward life? risk? goals? assumptions?) □ □ □

-Technical Skill Level (traveling? evaluating aval, hazard?) □ □ □

-Strength/Equipment (strength? prepared for the worst?) □ □ □

Overall Hazard Rating/GO or NO Go?

"HAZARD LEVEL SYMBOLS:

R = Red light (stop/dangerous) G = Green light (go/OK)

Y = Yellow light (caution/potentially dangerous). ©Alaska Mountain Safety Center, Inc.

"able 1-2. Avalanche hazard evaluation checklist.

CHAPTER 2

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