Dark Glasses and Goggles

On glaciers and snowfields it is necessary to wear dark glasses to avoid snow blindness and other eye damage caused by ultraviolet and infrared rays. Even on a cloudy dayf infrared rays can blind you—almost without discomfort, until it is too late. To be adequate for high mountain use, glasses must filter 100 percent of ultraviolet and infrared rays. The best usually come with leather side guards and, sometimes, nose guards. If you wear prescription sunglasses, make your optician fully aware of the need for total ultraviolet and infrared blockage.

In very stormy weather and high winds, goggles are sometimes necessary to maintain any vision at all. However, fogging often renders goggles useless, especially for those who wear prescription glasses-Various methods of ventilation have been devised to help alleviate this problem, the most successful to date being goggles equipped with a small, battery-operated fan—admittedly quite a technological solu-tionl Alternatively, lenses may be treated with antifog cream. Goggles or protective glasses are also recommended to shield the eyes from flying chips of ice,

Hardware ice climbing is a tool-intensive activity, and every individual ice climber seems to have a cherished opinion about which axe is the best, which crampon

Top: The major difference between an axe with a dasskaUy curved pick (on the (eft) raid one with a reverse carve {on the right) ii tint pulng out on the shaft tends to lode the classic curve into the Ice, but it dislodges the reverse curve. Also, on lower-angle slopes (up to about 60') the dassk curve is easier to plant fa the ice without bending over so far that you feel you are crawflng. Middle: A standard array of alpine ke-dintbing gear indodes: flexible twelve-point crampons; a 60 to 70cm ice axe with dasskdly curved pick; a 40 to 50cm North Wal hammer; several tubular ice screws; a handful of

slings awl rock protection devkes; a deadman or »ow pidcet(s); end mechanical ascender or prusik for crevasse travel. Bottom: A standard selection of gear f w waterfall ke cRmhfitg htdodes: monopoint paialtel-slded crampons; a matching set of reverse-curve tools with 45 to 55cm shafts, one with a cutting adie and one with a pounding anvil; half A dozen or more tubular ke screws; several Soarg-type pit cms; a book pit on or two; and slings and rock gear as appropriate to the chosen route. (Photos: Greg Lowe}

slings awl rock protection devkes; a deadman or »ow pidcet(s); end mechanical ascender or prusik for crevasse travel. Bottom: A standard selection of gear f w waterfall ke cRmhfitg htdodes: monopoint paialtel-slded crampons; a matching set of reverse-curve tools with 45 to 55cm shafts, one with a cutting adie and one with a pounding anvil; half A dozen or more tubular ke screws; several Soarg-type pit cms; a book pit on or two; and slings and rock gear as appropriate to the chosen route. (Photos: Greg Lowe}

the most versatile. Ice gear is expensive, and designs are ever-changing. It is best to try out several different models of axes and crampons to see which ones suit you. A lot of good used gear is available,- it could be just what you need—and might fit your budget, too.

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